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    Video Assistant Referee

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    Video Assistant Referee
    Video Assistant Referee

    Video Assistant Referee

    The video assistant referee (VAR) is a match official in association football who reviews decisions made by the head referee.Following extensive trialling in a number of major competitions, VAR was first written into the Laws of the Game by the International Football Association Board (IFAB) in 2018. Operating under the philosophy of "minimal interference, maximum benefit", the VAR system seeks to provide a way for "clear and obvious errors" and "serious missed incidents" to be corrected.
    Procedure. A Major League Soccer referee reviewing a play using a sideline monitor.
    There are 4 categories of decisions that can be reviewed:
    Goal/no goal – attacking team commits an offence, ball out of play, ball entering goal, offside, handball, offences and encroachment during penalty kicks.
    Penalty/no penalty – defending team commits an offence, ball out of play, location of offence, incorrect awarding, offence not penalised.
    Direct red card – denial of obvious goal-scoring opportunity, serious foul play, violent conduct/biting/spitting, using offensive/insulting/abusive language or gestures. All straight red cards are subject to review.
    Mistaken identity in awarding a red or yellow card.

    Check
    The VAR team, stationed in the video operation room (VOR), automatically checks every on-field referee decision falling under the four reviewable categories. If the VAR does not identify any mistake during the check, this is communicated to the referee. This is called a "silent check" and requires no further action, usually not causing any delay to the game. At other times, a VAR check may cause the game to be delayed while the VAR ascertains whether or not a possible mistake has occurred. The referee may delay the restart of play for this to occur, and indicates an ongoing check by pointing to their ear.
    Where the VAR does identify a possible clear and obvious error, there are three possible scenarios:
    Decision overturned on advice of VAR
    On-field review (OFR) recommended
    Referee chooses to ignore VAR advice

    A decision can generally be overturned without an OFR where it relates to a factual matter. For example, offside decisions or whether a foul occurred inside or outside the penalty area can be determined by the VAR to the referee without a review. An OFR is generally recommended where there is a subjective decision to make, such as whether a foul was committed in the first place or whether a red card is warranted for a certain offence. In all cases, the final decision rests with the referee, and they can choose to ignore the advice of the VAR altogether. On-field review (OFR)

    An OFR can only be conducted on the recommendation of the VAR. This ensures that the referee always makes an on-field ruling and does not rely on OFRs for every close decision. An OFR can be conducted when the ball is out of play, or where the referee stops play for the express purpose of conducting one.

    The referee signals an OFR by making the outline of a rectangle, indicating a video screen. The OFR takes place in a designated referee review area (RRA), adjacent to the field of play and in public view to ensure transparency. Slow motion replays are only used to establish point of contact for physical offences and handball, while full-speed replays are shown to determine the intensity of an offence or whether a handball occurred in the first place. During an OFR, the VAR transmits several video replays from different camera angles to allow the referee to make their decision.

    Once an OFR is completed, the referee makes the TV signal again, before indicating the decision made. If the ball was out of play, it restarts with either the original decision or the new decision if the on-field one was changed. If play was stopped to conduct an OFR and the decision was not changed, a dropped ball occurs. Offences

    A number of offences relating to the VAR process are codified within the Laws of the Game. Both players and team officials excessively making the TV signal are cautioned. Any player or team official entering the RRA are also cautioned. Finally, entering the VOR will cause a player or team official to be sent off. Assistant video assistant referee

    The assistant video assistant referee (AVAR) is a current or former referee appointed to assist the VAR in the video operation room. The responsibilities of the AVAR include watching the live action on the field while the VAR is undertaking a "check" or a "review", to keep a record of reviewable incidents, and to communicate the outcome of a review to broadcasters.

    VAR Goal
    VAR Goal

    VAR Goal

    All goals scored in the Premier League will automatically be checked by the Video Assistant Referee (VAR).They will check for any infringements by the attacking team in the attacking possession phase that led to the goal. For factual decisions such as offside or the ball being out of play, the VAR will inform the referee, who will overturn any award of a goal. For subjective decisions such as a foul or a handball, VAR can be used to overturn if a “clear and obvious error” has been identified. The referee will explain his decision to the VAR and what he has seen.If the evidence provided by the broadcast footage does not accord with what the referee believes he has seen, then the VAR can recommend an overturn. The final decision will remain with the on-field referee.

    VAR Foul
    VAR Foul

    VAR Foul

    All red cards awarded in the Premier League will automatically be checked by the Video Assistant Referee (VAR). The VAR will also check for possible red-card incidents for which the on-field referee has awarded a yellow card or no card at all. The VAR will look to identify a “clear and obvious error”. The on-field referee will explain his decision to the VAR and what he has seen. If the evidence provided to the VAR by the broadcast footage does not accord with what the referee believes he has seen, then the VAR can recommend an overturn. The final decision will remain with the on-field referee. For possible red-card incidents unseen by the match officials, the VAR has a short window to intervene. If the ball is in play, VAR has until the next re-start of play. If the ball is out of play, VAR has until the second restart of play. For incidents not captured by the match officials or VAR, The FA’s retrospective disciplinary process remains. The VAR will not intervene for an incident where a second yellow card leads to a red card, unless the VAR believes the second yellow card should be upgraded to a red.

    VAR Penalty
    VAR Penalty

    VAR Penalty

    All penalties awarded in the Premier League will automatically be checked by the Video Assistant Referee (VAR), who will also check for possible penalties not given by the on-field referee. For penalties awarded the VAR will check for any infringements by the attacking team in the attacking possession phase that led to the penalty as well as the incident for which the penalty was awarded. For factual decisions such as offside or the ball being out of play in the build-up, the VAR will inform the referee, who will overturn any penalty awarded. For subjective penalty decisions, such as for a foul or for a handball, the VAR will look to identify a “clear and obvious error”. The referee will explain his decision to the VAR and what he has seen. If the evidence provided to the VAR by the broadcast footage does not accord with what the referee believes he has seen, then the VAR can recommend an overturn. The final decision will remain with the on-field referee. If a penalty decision is overturned with no infringement by the attacking team, play will restart with an uncontested drop ball for the defending team.

    VAR Offside
    VAR Offside

    VAR Offside

    Where there is a clear and obvious goalscoring opportunity and the assistant referee is not certain whether the attacker actively involved is in an offside position, the assistant should delay indicating the offence until the phase of play has concluded.
    Where there is a clear and obvious goalscoring opportunity and the assistant referee is certain the attacker actively involved is in an offside position, then the assistant should indicate the offence immediately.
    In both of these situations the referee should wait to blow the whistle until the immediate phase of play has ended.
    Factual offside decisions will be based on the evidence provided by fully calibrated offside lines.

    VAR Mistaken Identity
    VAR Mistaken Identity

    VAR Mistaken Identity

    In the event that the on-field referee awards a yellow or red card to the wrong player, or is unsure of the player to award it to, the VAR will advise the referee as to the correct player to be disciplined.

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